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HOW LARGE WAS THE ICEBERG THAT SANK THE TITANIC

The exact size of the iceberg will probably never be known but, according to early newspaper reports the height and length of the iceberg was approximated at 50 to 100 feet high and 200 to 400 feet long.

Titanic iceberg. Please click on picture for a more detailed description.

This is a scanned copy of the photographic print of the iceberg with which the RMS TITANIC supposedly collided on April 14, 1912 at latitude 41-46N, longitude 50-14W.

This print was in possession of Captain De Carteret, the Captain of the Cable ship MINIA, reportedly stated that this was the only iceberg near the scene of the collision. The MINIA was one of the first ships to reach the scene following the disaster. It was dispatched after the Western Union Cable ship MACKAY BENNET by White Star Lines to recover debris from the Titanic. During this operation, the MINIA found debris and bodies floating in the vicinity of the above iceberg. Therefore, it is assumed that this is the iceberg that the TITANIC struck. Captain De Carteret gave the print to Captain A. L. Gamble, Commanding Officer of the USCGC SENECA.



Titanic iceberg. Please click on picture for a more detailed description.

This is a scanned copy of the photographic print of the iceberg with which the RMS TITANIC supposedly collided on April 14, 1912 at latitude 41-46N, longitude 50-14W.

This iceberg was photographed by the chief steward of the liner Prinze Adelbert on the morning of April 15, 1912, just a few miles south of where the Titanic went down. The steward hadn't yet heard about the Titanic. What caught his attention was the smear of red paint along the base of the berg, indication that it had collided with a ship sometime in the previous twelve hours. This photo and informaiton was taken from "UNSINKABLE" The Full Story of RMS Titanic Written by Daniel Allen Butler, Stackpole Books 1998.

Other accounts indicated that there were several icebergs in the vicinity where the TITANIC collided.