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DGPS INTEGRITY MONITORS
DIFFERENTIAL GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM INTEGRITY MONITORS
SECTION C
STATEMENT OF WORK
DIFFERENTIAL GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM
INTEGRITY MONITORS
28 March 1994

CONTENTS
                                                            Page 
1.0  INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
     1.1  BACKGROUND  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
     1.2  FUNCTIONAL EMPLOYMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
     1.3  SCOPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
2.0  REFERENCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     2.1  GENERAL REFERENCES  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     2.2  TECHNICAL REFERENCES  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     2.3  AVAILABILITY OF REFERENCES  . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
3.0  REQUIREMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
     3.1  TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
          3.1.1  GENERAL TECHNICAL  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
          3.1.2  GPS RECEIVER PERFORMANCE . . . . . . . . . .  9
          3.1.3  RADIOBEACON MONITORING PERFORMANCE . . . . . 10
          3.1.4  ERROR DETECTION AND ALARMS . . . . . . . . . 10
          3.1.5  FUNCTIONS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
          3.1.6  CONDITIONS FOR OPERATION . . . . . . . . . . 13
          3.1.7  PHYSICAL/ENVIRONMENTAL . . . . . . . . . . . 14
     3.2  TRAINING  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
     3.3  DELIVERABLES AND FURNISHED PROPERTY . . . . . . . . 16
          3.3.1  CONTRACTOR DELIVERABLES  . . . . . . . . . . 16
          3.3.2  CONTRACTOR FURNISHED PROPERTY  . . . . . . . 17
          3.3.3  GOVERNMENT FURNISHED PROPERTY  . . . . . . . 17
     3.4  PRODUCTION/DELIVERY SCHEDULE  . . . . . . . . . . . 17
     3.5  MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
          3.5.1  MAINTENANCE  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
          3.5.2  RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE GOVERNMENT . . . . . 19
          3.5.3  ACCEPTANCE OF REPAIRED/REPLACED EQUIPMENT. . 19
4.0  PROGRESS/COMPLIANCE  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
     4.1  QUALITY ASSURANCE PROVISIONS  . . . . . . . . . . . 19
          4.1.1  CALIBRATION AND MAINTENANCE SYSTEM . . . . . 19
          4.1.2  MINIMUM INSPECTIONS  . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
          4.1.3  PRODUCTION TEST PLAN   . . . . . . . . . . . 20
          4.1.4  PRODUCTION TEST AND INSPECTION PROCEDURES  . 21
          4.1.5  PRODUCTION TEST AND INSPECTION RESULTS . . . 21
          4.1.6  HISTORY DATA SHEETS  . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
     4.2  GOVERNMENT TESTS  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
          4.2.1  FIRST ARTICLE TESTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
          4.2.2  PRODUCTION LOT ACCEPTANCE TESTS. . . . . . . 22
          4.2.3  SPECIAL TEST EQUIPMENT . . . . . . . . . . . 22
     4.3  ACCEPTANCE  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
     4.4  DOCUMENTATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
          4.4.1  MONTHLY PROGRESS REPORTS . . . . . . . . . . 22
          4.4.2  PROGRAM EVALUATION AND REVIEW REPORTS. . . . 23
          4.4.3  TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION  . . . . . . . . . . 23
     4.5  PROGRESS REVIEW MEETINGS  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
5.0  DELIVERY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
6.0  NOTES  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
FIGURE 3.1: PROJECT TIMELINE  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
FIGURE 3.2: FIRST ARTICLE TEST SCHEDULE . . . . . . . . . . . 27
TABLE 4.1: TEST AND INSPECTION PROCEDURES . . . . . . . . . . 28
TABLE 4.2: HISTORY DATA SHEETS  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
SECTION C
STATEMENT OF WORK
DIFFERENTIAL GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM
INTEGRITY MONITORS

1.0  INTRODUCTION
1.1  BACKGROUND
The United States Coast Guard is chartered as a Department of
Transportation (DOT) agency to provide US aids to navigation for
safe and efficient marine navigation.  Therefore, one of the Coast
Guard's missions is to establish, maintain and operate electronic
aids to navigation which serve the needs of the US armed forces,
maritime commerce and air commerce (as requested by the Federal
Aviation Administration).  The Coast Guard has been meeting this
mission through the employment of many electronic navigational aids
such as Loran-A, Loran-C, and Omega.
The Department of Defense began development of the satellite-based
Global Positioning System (GPS) in 1973.  Positional accuracy
available to authorized users of GPS, designated as Precise
Positioning Service (PPS), is 16 meters spherical error probable,
or 21 meters two distance root mean square (2drms).  (An authorized
user employs the proper classified encryption keys and PPS-capable
GPS receiver to extract the high accuracy encrypted signal.)  Due
to encryption of the PPS signals, all other users, being non-
authorized, have access to only the less accurate Standard 
Positioning Service (SPS).  SPS accuracy without Selective Availability
(SA) is 54 meters (2drms).  With the addition of SA and Anti-
Spoofing (AS) techniques, non-authorized user accuracy has been
intentionally degraded to approximately 100 meters.  
GPS experimentation and analysis has brought forth the development
of Differential GPS (DGPS) techniques which enable users to obtain
accuracy's much higher than would normally be attainable.  In 1983
the US Coast Guard began investigating these techniques to deter-
mine if DGPS was a practical and effective way to meet increasing
marine navigation accuracy needs.  Coast Guard conducted field
tests from 1987 to 1989 demonstrated positional accuracy's within
10 meters (2drms) and often better than 8 meters (2drms).  In 1990
the Coast Guard established the DGPS Navigation System Project.
The Coast Guard's Electronics Engineering Center (EECEN) has been
tasked to develop and deploy a network of 50 DGPS sites along the
US coast.  Nine prototype DGPS sites have been established to
assist in testing and optimizing the utility and reliability of
DGPS service.  EECEN has been installing, maintaining and 
evaluating most of these prototype sites since 1992.  
The DGPS project is now entering the implementation stage.  An
assessment of the commercial marketplace has confirmed that DGPS
Integrity Monitor technology is available.  This investigation has
further shown that changes which may be needed for existing 
commercial equipment to meet Coast Guard needs do not represent a
major and substantial research and developmental effort by 
manufacturers.  It has been found that this effort is therefore a Non-
Developmental Item (NDI) acquisition. 
1.2  FUNCTIONAL EMPLOYMENT
The high reliability and availability required of the Coast Guard's
DGPS service rest upon the ability to ensure the integrity of
broadcast information in a timely fashion.  
The Integrity Monitor serves to monitor marine radiobeacon broad-
cast signals as well as signal content (the accuracy of DGPS
Reference Station-generated corrections).  When monitored 
parameters exceed specified thresholds, the Integrity Monitor will 
generate appropriate alarms.  The Integrity Monitor also provides
positive feedback to the Reference Station at regular intervals,
ensuring the Reference Station is informed of Integrity Monitor
status.  The Integrity Monitor will feature a data logger output
port, providing a way to externally record measured parameters.
Functionally, an Integrity Monitor consists of an integrated GPS
reference receiver, marine radiobeacon Minimum Shift Keying (MSK)
receiver, processor, electrical interfaces, power supply and 
receiving antennas.  The Integrity Monitor communicates with a 
collocated Reference Station via direct hardwired connection and with
a remotely located Control Station via packet switching network. 
The Reference Station, Integrity Monitor and Control Station 
communicate by exchanging Reference Station/Integrity Monitor messages
(RSIM messages) as detailed in referenced documents.
The Integrity Monitor will be installed in a standard electronic
equipment cabinet along with other electronic equipment, which 
together constitute the DGPS electronics suite.  Installations will
employ two Integrity Monitors per suite for redundancy, and will
help ensure high levels of system availability for the user.  DGPS
suites will be housed in shelters located at sites within the
United States and its territories.  Typically, the Integrity 
Monitor's receiving antennas will be mounted on a 3 or 6 meter high
metal tower located approximately 20 meters from the shelter. 
1.3  SCOPE
The purpose of this contract is to procure and support Differential
GPS Integrity Monitors which monitor marine radiobeacon signals and
Reference Station-generated corrections, communicate with Control
and Reference Stations, provide appropriate feedback and alarm
signals, and provide a means of recording monitored parameters.
2.0  REFERENCES 
2.1  GENERAL REFERENCES.  
The following documents are included for informational purposes and
are not to be construed as compliance documents.
2.1.1     1992 Federal Radionavigation Plan, US Department of
Transportation, DOT-VNTSC-RSPA-92-2, and US Department of Defense,
DOD-4650.0, National Technical Information Service, Springfield,
VA. Sections 3.2.10 and A.2.9 of this reference describe 
Differential GPS status, plans, and description.
2.1.2     Alsip, DH, Butler, JM, and Radice, JT, Implementation Of
The  US Coast Guard's Differential GPS Navigation Service, USCG
Headquarters, Office of Navigation Safety and Waterway Services,
Washington, DC, June 23, 1993.
 
2.2  TECHNICAL REFERENCES
The following documents of the exact issue form a part of this
specification to the extent specified herein.  In the event of a
conflict between the documents referenced herein and the content of
this specification, the content of this specification shall be 
considered a superseding requirement.  Documents referenced herein are
presented in order of precedence.  Reference 2.2.5 is not an
approved RTCM Recommended Standard.
2.2.1     Code of Federal Regulations, Title 47, Part 15, Federal
Communications Commission Rules and Regulations, 1992. 
2.2.2     Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio
Frequency Management, US Department of Commerce, National 
Telecommunications and Information Administration, Annex K, Revised
5/93,Washington, DC. 
 
2.2.3     Broadcast Standard for the USCG DGPS Navigation Service,
U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Instruction (COMDTINST) M16577.1, US
Department of Transportation, United States Coast Guard,
Washington, DC, April 1993.
2.2.4     RTCM Recommended Standards for Differential Navstar GPS
Service, Version 2.1, RTCM Paper 194-93/SC104-STD, Radio Technical
Commission for Maritime Services, RTCM Special Committee No. 104,
Washington, DC, January 3, 1994.
2.2.5     RTCM Recommended Standards for Differential Navstar/GPS
Maritime Reference Stations and Integrity Monitors, Second Draft,
Working Draft of Future Version 1.0, RTCM Paper 199-93/SC104-X,
Radio Technical Commission for Maritime Services, Special Committee
104 RSIM Working Group, Washington, DC, December 29, 1993.
2.2.6     American National Standard for Bit Sequencing of the
American National Standard Code for Information Interchange in
Serial-by-Bit Data Transmission, ANSI X3.15-1976, American National
Standards Institute, New York, NY, June 25, 1976.
2.2.7     American National Standard for Character Structure and
Character Parity Sense for Serial-by-Bit Data Communication in the
American National Standard Code for Information Interchange, ANSI
X3.16-1976, American National Standards Institute, New York, NY,
June 25, 1976.
2.2.8     American National Standard Code for Information 
Interchange, ANSI X3.4-1977, (ASCII), American National Standards
Institute, New York, NY, 1977.
 
2.2.9     EIA Standard, Cabinets, Racks, Panels, and Associated
Equipment, EIA-310-D, Electronic Industries Association, 
Washington, DC, September 1992.
2.2.10    EIA Standard, Electrical Characteristics of Balanced
Voltage Digital Interface Circuits, EIA-422-A, Electronic 
Industries Association, Washington, DC, December 1978.
2.3  AVAILABILITY OF REFERENCES
2.3.1     The above referenced documents are available for 
inspection at the location below.  They may be inspected during
business hours of 7:00 a.m. through 3:30 p.m., Monday through
Friday, exclusive of Federal holidays throughout the proposal
preparation period.  An appointment is required and shall be
arranged by the contractor at least one work day prior to the
desired appointment by scheduling with the contact provided.
     US Coast Guard
     Electronics Engineering Center (As)
     PO Box 60
     Wildwood, NJ  08260-0060
     Attn: Ms. Marion Veber (G-ACS-1A)            609-523-7219
2.3.2     The above referenced documents are also available from
the following sources:
Reference 2.1.1:
     Elizabeth Carpenter
     US Department of Transportation
     Transportation Systems Center
     Kendall Square, Cambridge, MA  02412         617-494-2126
Reference 2.1.2, 2.2.3 and 2.2.5:
     Commandant (G-NRN-2)
     US Coast Guard Headquarters
     2100 Second Street, S.W.
     Washington, DC  20593                        202-267-0298
Reference 2.2.1 and 2.2.2:
     Superintendent of Documents
     Government Printing Office
     Post Office Box 371954
     Pittsburgh, PA  15250-7954                   202-783-3238
Reference 2.2.4
     Radio Technical Commission for Maritime Services
     655 Fifteenth Street, NW, Suite 300
     Washington, DC 20005                         202-639-4006
Reference 2.2.6, 2.2.7 and 2.2.8:
     American National Standards Institute
     1430 Broadway
     New York, NY 10018                           212-642-4900
Reference 2.2.9 and 2.2.10:
     Electronic Industries Association
     Engineering Department
     1990 M Street N.W., Suite 400
     Washington, DC 20006                         202-451-4900
                                                  800-854-7179
3.0  REQUIREMENTS
3.1  TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS
Proposed design characteristics, written or demonstrated by the
technical sample, which exceed Integrity Monitor requirements
described herein shall be retained in all Integrity Monitors 
supplied under this contract at the discretion of the government.
3.1.1     General Technical
3.1.1.1   Each Integrity Monitor shall comply with the following
documents or portions thereof.  Although they are cited throughout
this specification, citations are not intended to be all-inclusive
and shall not excuse the contractor from compliance with this
paragraph:
          A.   Technical Reference 2.2.3:  Broadcast Standard for
the USCG DGPS Navigation Service, U.S. Coast Guard Commandant
Instruction (COMDTINST) M16577.1, US Department of Transportation,
United States Coast Guard, Washington, DC, April 1993. This document
describes the parameters and content of DGPS marine radiobeacon
broadcast signals which an Integrity Monitor shall receive
and evaluate.  This document shall apply in its entirety.  
          B.   Technical Reference 2.2.4:  RTCM Recommended
Standards for Differential Navstar GPS Service, Version 2.1, RTCM
Paper 194-93/SC104-STD, Radio Technical Commission for Maritime
Services, RTCM Special Committee No. 104, Washington, DC, January
3, 1994.  Integrity Monitors shall specifically conform to
Paragraphs 4.1, 4.2, 4.3.1, 4.3.3, 4.3.5, 4.3.6, 4.3.7, 4.3.9,
4.3.16 (Data Message Formats) and Appendix III (Satellite Position
Computation Test Files) of this reference.
          C.   Technical Reference 2.2.5:  RTCM Recommended
Standards for Differential Navstar/GPS Maritime Reference Stations
and Integrity Monitors, Second Draft, Working Draft of Future
Version 1.0, RTCM Paper 199-93/SC104-X, Radio Technical Commission
for Maritime Services, Special Committee 104 RSIM Working Group,
Washington, DC, December 29, 1993.  Integrity Monitors shall
specifically conform to Sections 4 (Integrity Monitor), 5 (RSIM
Messages), 6.2.4 (Time-to-Alarm), 7.3.1-7.3.3 (Monitoring and Error
Detection) and Appendix I (Glossary) of this reference.  The
Integrity Monitor shall be capable of using each message type as 
indicated in the "USAGE" paragraphs of the RSIM message descriptions.
3.1.1.2   The Integrity Monitor shall employ at least the four 
discrete signal ports described below.  The contractor shall ensure
all ports are clearly and permanently marked, and shall provide all
mating connectors.  (Note: the numbering and order of ports given
below is for convenience of this document and does not represent a
requirement.)
     Port 1:   GPS/MSK signal input(s).
     Port 2:   RS-422 input/output to Packet Assembler/
	       Disassembler (PAD) in RSIM message format.
     Port 3:   RS-422 output to Data Logger, RSIM message format.
     Port 4:   RS-422 output of RSIM Message 20, Integrity Monitor
               System Feedback to the Reference Station.
3.1.1.3   The Integrity Monitor's GPS/MSK signal input port(s)
shall have an input impedance of 50 ohms with a Voltage Standing
Wave Ratio (VSWR) of less than 1.5:1.
3.1.1.4   The L1 GPS receiving portion of the antenna assembly
shall have the characteristics described below.  An antenna design
shall be used which minimizes multipath effects.  The Integrity
Monitor shall supply any power or signals needed by the GPS
receiving antenna.
     A.   Gain roll-off from 7.5 degrees to -20 degrees in elevation
	  shall be greater than 10 dB.
     B.   Axial ratio between 0 degrees and 45 degrees in elevation
          shall be less than 2.3 dB.
     C.   Gain variation vs. elevation above 7.5 degrees in elevation
	  shall be less than 6 dB from the peak value.
3.1.1.5   The marine radiobeacon MSK receiving portion of the
antenna assembly shall enable the Integrity Monitor to operate in
the near field of a 283.5-325 kHz marine radiobeacon.  Equipment
shall be configurable to allow reception of MSK signals with
electric field strengths ranging from 1 to 24 volts per meter and
magnetic field strengths ranging from 0.18  to 4 milliamperes per
meter.  The Integrity Monitor shall supply any power or signals
needed by the MSK receiving antenna.
3.1.2     GPS Receiver Performance
3.1.2.1   The Integrity Monitor shall be capable of continuously
and simultaneously tracking single frequency (L1) Coarse/
Acquisition (C/A) GPS satellite signals from twelve satellites.
3.1.2.2   The Integrity Monitor shall have a minimum C/A code phase
measurement accuracy of 30 cm (rms), exclusive of the Integrity
Monitor clock time and frequency offsets, as evidenced by residuals
under controlled laboratory conditions.
3.1.2.3   The Integrity Monitor shall have a minimum C/A code range
rate measurement accuracy of 4 cm/sec (rms), exclusive of the
Integrity Monitor clock frequency offset, as evidenced by residuals
under controlled laboratory conditions.
3.1.2.4   The Integrity Monitor's Time To First Fix (TTFF) shall
not exceed 30 minutes for an Integrity Monitor which does not have
a current stored almanac and shall not exceed 5 minutes for an
Integrity Monitor which does have a current stored almanac.
3.1.3     Radiobeacon Monitoring Performance
3.1.3.1   The Integrity Monitor shall be capable of receiving RTCM
broadcast message types 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 15 and 16 at broadcast
rates of 50, 100 and 200 bits per second.  The Integrity Monitor
shall be capable of receiving RTCM corrections for nine satellites
as generated by the Reference Station.  Information on message type
15 is given in paragraph 6.1 of this Statement of Work.
3.1.3.2   The Integrity Monitor shall exhibit a maximum bit error
ratio of 10-3 when the signal-to-noise ratio in the 99% power 
containment bandwidth is 10 dB.
3.1.3.3   The Integrity Monitor shall be capable of alarming on low
radiobeacon signal strength as defined in RSIM Messages 16 and 17. 
The detection of low radiobeacon signal-to-noise ratio, as
described in RSIM Messages 16 and 17, is not required.
3.1.3.4   The Integrity Monitor shall measure and report a Message
Error Ratio (MER), which is a method of measuring RTCM data
throughput.  The MER shall be defined as follows: When one of the
thirty bit words in a given RTCM message fails parity, all bits for
the entire message (including first and second header words) are
considered "bad."  The MER is the number of bad bits divided by the
number of total bits observed over the observation time.  MER
thresholds and observation times shall be set by the Control
Station via RSIM Message 16 and MER shall be reported to the
Control Station via RSIM Message 15.  
 
3.1.3.5   The Integrity Monitor shall monitor the age of 
pseudorange corrections broadcast by the radiobeacon.  The Integrity
Monitor shall determine correction age at least once per second by
comparing the modified Z-count time tag of the most recent broadcast
pseudorange corrections to the Integrity Monitor's current
estimate of GPS time.  If the age exceeds the threshold set via
RSIM Message 16, the Integrity Monitor shall generate an alarm to
the Control Station via RSIM Message 17.
3.1.4     Error Detection and Alarms
3.1.4.1   The Integrity Monitor shall verify Reference Station
generated pseudorange corrections by making GPS pseudorange 
measurements, correcting these GPS pseudorange measurements with
received RTCM corrections, and then comparing these corrected
pseudoranges to those computed using the Integrity Monitor's known
position.  The Integrity Monitor shall account for the effect of
its own clock bias in measuring the difference between the computed
range to the satellite (based on ephemeris information and the
Integrity Monitor's known position) and the corrected-measured
range.  This evaluation shall yield the error associated with each
correction-measurement combination.  This error shall be reported
as the pseudorange residual.  The Integrity Monitor shall report
pseudorange residuals to the Control Station via RSIM Message 19 as
requested, or according to an interval selected by the Control
Station via RSIM Message 1.  The rms value of the pseudorange
residual for a given satellite shall be within 1 meter of the
actual uncorrected error component in the pseudorange corrections
for that satellite.  The actual uncorrected error component is
defined to exclude the Reference Station's clock bias contribution
to the pseudorange corrections.
3.1.4.2   The Integrity Monitor shall compute the range rate 
residual by comparing the broadcast range rate corrections with the
GPS range rate measurements made by the Integrity Monitor.  The
Integrity Monitor shall report range rate residuals to the Control
Station via RSIM Message 19. 
3.1.4.3   The Integrity Monitor shall verify DGPS positioning
accuracy by applying received RTCM corrections to received GPS
observables and calculating a corrected position.  The Integrity
Monitor's calculated position shall then be compared to its known
reference position, and the resulting difference shall be reported
to the Control Station via RSIM Message 18.  In addition, the 
Integrity Monitor shall calculate a horizontal radial error, and 
generate a position alarm via RSIM Messages 17 and 20 if this value
exceeds the threshold set by the Control Station in RSIM Message
16.
3.1.4.4   The Integrity Monitor shall verify Reference Station
generated User Differential Range Errors (UDRE) by comparing these
to the Integrity Monitor calculated pseudorange residuals.  If a
broadcast UDRE is less than the absolute value of the pseudorange
residual for a period of time exceeding the prescribed percentage
of the observation interval, the Integrity Monitor shall generate
a Low UDRE alarm via RSIM Message 17.  The observation interval and
prescribed percentage of this interval constituting threshold shall
be selected by the Control Station via RSIM Message 16.   
3.1.4.5   When the horizontal position error alarm threshold is
exceeded for the observation period, RSIM Message 20 shall be
generated within 1 second.  The Integrity Monitor shall also flag
any single PRN within 1 second of a pseudorange residual alarm,
using RSIM Message 20, without adversely affecting the evaluations
of other corrected pseudoranges output in RSIM Message 19.  The
Integrity Monitor shall set the position flag of RSIM Message 20 to
unmonitored within 1 second of the occurrence of a high HDOP or low
UDRE alarm.
3.1.4.6   In addition to RSIM Message 20, the Integrity Monitor
shall communicate alarms through Port 2 to the Control Station as
described in the RSIM message definitions.  When an alarm threshold
is exceeded for an observation period, the Integrity Monitor shall
generate an alarm within 2.5 seconds of conclusion of the 
observation period.
3.1.4.7  The Integrity Monitor shall implement RSIM Message 23 as
defined in the reference of 3.1.1.1.C, with the following
clarification.  If the reporting of RSIM Message 23 is enabled by
an RSIM Message 1 with an interval of zero, then an RSIM Message 23
is to be sent from the Integrity Monitor to the Control Station
whenever an RTCM message is correctly decoded from the broadcast. 
In the RSIM message 23 definition: Field 8 will be filled with an
integer in the range of 0-16777215 (see page 5-34 of reference
3.1.1.1.C), representing the 24 information bits in a 30 bit RTCM
word (parity takes six bits).  Demodulated RTCM words that do not
pass parity checks are not reported by RSIM Message 23.  For Note
3, the units are given in Table 5-2 of reference 3.1.1.1.C. 
3.1.5     Functions
3.1.5.1   The Integrity Monitor shall report to and be controlled
by a Control Station via RSIM messages sent through a packet
switching network.  In addition to this "remote" capability, the
Integrity Monitor shall be capable of being operated and controlled
locally to facilitate system installation, checkout, unit-level
fault isolation and testing.  The contractor shall supply a local
control capability with each Integrity Monitor which shall allow
access to Integrity Monitor RSIM functions and data normally
accessible via RSIM Messages 3, 5, 6, 7 and 14, and display of
Universal Time Coordinated (UTC), radiobeacon signal strength and
signal-to-noise ratio.  This capability shall hereinafter be
referred to as the Local Control Interface.
3.1.5.2   All RS-422 ports shall comply with EIA-422-A (Dec 1978). 
ASCII data transmitted via these ports shall be in serial 
asynchronous form and comply with ANSI X3.15 (1976), X3.16 (1976),
and X3.4(1977).  These ports shall be capable of operating at 9600 
baud with 8 data bits, no parity, and 1 stop bit (9600,8,N,1).  If 
these port communication parameters are user-selectable, the above 
parameters shall be the default configuration.  The Integrity Monitor
shall use XON/XOFF data flow control for PAD and Data Logger ports.
3.1.5.3   The Integrity Monitor shall have self test and diagnostic
functions.  Self test shall verify proper Integrity Monitor operation
and, upon failure of self test, diagnostics shall isolate and
indicate failures to major subsystems or components of the Integrity
Monitor.  Partial and full reset commands, and subsequent diagnostic
report, are described in the RSIM Standard.
3.1.5.4   The Integrity Monitor shall retain operator control
parameters and almanac data in memory which shall enable the
Integrity Monitor to recover from a power outage of at least 240
hours.  Upon restoration of power and without intervention, the
Integrity Monitor shall execute a partial reset, self test and
diagnostics, and return to the operational state prior to power
loss.  A partial reset involves restarting the GPS receiver 
operating software and clearing run-time random access memory while
retaining operator control parameters and almanac data. The Integrity
Monitor shall execute a partial reset as a result of each of the
following independent conditions: a) restoration of power, b)
turning the unit on, and c) receipt of a partial reset command via
RSIM Message 3, and as commanded through the Local Control
Interface.
3.1.5.5   The Integrity Monitor shall be capable of executing a
full reset, which involves a complete memory clearing, full self
test, and diagnostic report.  Following a full reset, operator
control parameters shall revert to factory defaults, including the
communication port defaults as described previously.  The Integrity
Monitor shall execute a full reset as a result of each of the
following independent conditions: a) receipt of a full reset
command via RSIM Message 3, and b) a series or combination of
deliberate operator actions through the Local Control Interface.
3.1.6     Conditions for Operation
3.1.6.1   The Integrity Monitor shall meet or exceed all performance
specifications under the following conditions:  
     A.   The L1 C/A code signal power level incident upon the   
	  antenna shall range from -160 dBw to -153 dBw.
     B.   A minimum of 4 satellites shall be in view with the
	  aforementioned power levels and minimum elevation angles
	  of 7.5 degrees.
     C.   All specifications shall apply to satellites which have
	  been tracked for at least 120 seconds.  As the Integrity
	  Monitor commences or ends the tracking of any satellite 
	  for any reason, all specifications shall apply to all 
	  other tracked satellites.
3.1.6.2   The Integrity Monitor shall continue to function
normally, in compliance with all technical specifications, while
under the following simultaneous minimum loading:  receiving RTCM
message type 9 for groups of 3 satellites at 200 bps;  sending RSIM
Message 23 to the Control Station whenever a new set of corrections
is received (approximately once per second);  processing and sending
at least one RSIM Message 20 to the Reference Station every 3
seconds; receiving and processing at least one RSIM control input
from the Control Station per minute; and sending RSIM Messages 15
and 18 to the Data Logger every two minutes.
3.1.6.3   The Integrity Monitor shall meet or exceed all specifications
when the Integrity Monitor antenna assembly is situated as close as
twelve meters from an Omni-directional marine radiobeacon antenna 
radiating a carrier in the frequency band of 283.5-325 kHz
to which the Integrity Monitor is tuned with an effective radiated
power of up to 150 watts.
3.1.6.4   The Integrity Monitor shall survive exposure to S-band
marine radar radiation.  In a normal operating mode, the Integrity
Monitor may be subject to radiation consisting of a burst of 10
pulses, each 1.0 to 1.5 microseconds long on a duty cycle of 1600:1
at a frequency lying between 2.9 gHz and 3.1 gHz at a power density
of approximately 100 watts per square meter.  The condition may be
maintained for 10 minutes with the bursts of pulses repeated every
3 seconds.  When the unwanted signal is removed and the Integrity
Monitor antennas are exposed to normal GPS satellite and DGPS
radiobeacon signals, the Integrity Monitor shall return to full and
normal operation, meeting or exceeding all specifications within
the time limits previously specified (TTFF).  Integrity Monitors
exposed to the above radiation at power density levels exceeding
100 watts per square meter shall not sustain damage beyond the
antenna assembly.
3.1.7     Physical/Environmental
3.1.7.1   The Integrity Monitor rack equipment shall be less than
18 cm high.  It shall be of external dimensions and configuration
for installation in a standard electronic equipment cabinet
accommodating a 482.6 mm panel width and employing universal
mounting flange hole spacing as described in EIA-310-D, commonly
referred to as a "standard 19-inch rack mount."  The Integrity
Monitor shall include all hardware necessary for installation. 
Section 1 of EIA-310-D shall apply in its entirety.
3.1.7.2   The Integrity Monitor shall operate from a commercial 115
volt (10%), 60 hertz (6%) AC source and consume not more than 30
watts of average power.  It shall also be capable of operating from
a 12 volt (1 volt) DC power source, and shall include a separate
12 volt DC input connector.
3.1.7.3   The Integrity Monitor antenna assembly shall receive GPS
L1 satellite signals and marine radiobeacon MSK differential 
correction signals.  The antenna assembly shall include all items
necessary to collect and deliver these signals to the Integrity
Monitor's signal input port(s).  This shall include antenna
systems, mounts, cables and connectors.  Separate GPS and MSK
antennas are acceptable. 
3.1.7.4   The Integrity Monitor shall meet or exceed all specifications
with antenna cable length ranging from 5 meters to 30 meters without 
in-line amplification.  Each Integrity Monitor antenna shall be supplied
with an accessible antenna cable connector, not less than 30 continuous
meters of antenna cable which has a connector installed on one end only,
two uninstalled connectors, and complete connector installation 
instructions.  Integrity Monitor signal input port and antenna output
connectors shall be the same. 
3.1.7.5   If the GPS portion of the contractor's production antenna
assembly includes a preamplifier (or other electronic equipment)
and if this assembly does not feature an accessible connector
between the GPS antenna and other equipment, the contractor shall
deliver two special test antenna assemblies which have said connector.
These test antenna assemblies shall be otherwise identical
to production units and shall be delivered to the government prior
to first article tests.  The connector used shall be the same as
those of paragraph 3.1.7.4.  The contractor shall provide mating
connectors with each test antenna assembly.
3.1.7.6   If a separate port is not provided for the MSK signal
entering the Integrity Monitor from the antenna assembly, then the
test antenna assemblies shall include an insertion point for
simulated MSK signal inputs.
3.1.7.7   Antenna assemblies shall have an internal thread mount of
contractor-selected standard size.  The mounted antenna assembly
shall be capable of withstanding sustained winds of 100 mph, and
gusts of 135 mph without failing, yielding, loosening, or otherwise
degrading or permitting a change of mounted antenna orientation.
3.1.7.8   Antenna assemblies shall be waterproof and constructed of
ultraviolet-resistant materials.  The antenna assembly's shape,
finish, or other parameters or methods or combinations thereof
shall be employed to minimize the accumulation of ice or snow.  Any
method employed to minimize the accumulation of ice or snow shall
be automatic and self-contained, or passive.
  
3.1.7.9   The Integrity Monitor shall meet or exceed all performance
specifications while operating in temperatures ranging from
0 to +50 degrees Celsius for the Integrity Monitor, and from -40 to
+65 degrees Celsius for the antenna assembly.
3.1.7.10  The Integrity Monitor shall survive a temperature ranging
from -20 to +60 degrees Celsius for the Integrity Monitor and from
-40 to +70 degrees Celsius for the antenna assembly.  Integrity
Monitors and antenna assemblies shall meet all specifications when
returned to operational temperature range.
3.1.7.11  The Integrity Monitor shall meet or exceed all performance
specifications while operating under an operational humidity
range from 0 to 95 percent relative non-condensing for the Integrity
Monitor and from 0 to 100 percent relative condensing for the
antenna assembly. 
3.1.7.12  All connectors shall be water-resistant when mated or
capped.  In  addition, the Integrity Monitor, including antenna
assembly and all connectors, shall survive long-term exposure to
corrosive salt air environments typical of marine applications
without adverse affect.
  
3.1.7.13  The Integrity Monitor shall conform to applicable Federal
Communications Commission (FCC) and National Telecommunications and
Information Administration (NTIA) rules and regulations.
3.2  TRAINING
3.2.1     Installation Team Training.  The contractor shall provide
government installation team personnel with training and instruction
in the proper installation, setup, checkout, operation, maintenance
and troubleshooting of Integrity Monitor equipment.  The contractor 
shall supply all equipment and material necessary for such training.
Training shall be approximately two days in duration for not more 
than twenty persons.  The contractor shall provide 20 complete sets
of training material and the right to reproduce and adapt these 
materials as needed for government training.  Training shall be 
conducted at the Coast Guard's Electronic Engineering Center, 
Wildwood, NJ.
3.3  DELIVERABLES AND FURNISHED PROPERTY
3.3.1     Contractor Deliverables.  The contractor shall supply the
following in accordance with the schedule.  References, where
given, are to appropriate paragraphs of this statement of work:
3.3.1.1   Integrity Monitors which include:
          Integrity Monitor and mounting hardware 
          GPS/MSK Receiving Antenna Assembly and mounting hardware
          Power and Antenna cables
          All connectors and mating connectors
          Operation and Maintenance Manual 
          Local Control Interface 
          
3.3.1.2   Special Test Antenna Assemblies and mating connectors
          (reference 3.1.7.5) 
3.3.1.3   Production Test Plan (reference 4.1.3)
3.3.1.4   Production Test and Inspection Procedures 
          (reference 4.1.4)
3.3.1.5   Production Test and Inspection Results (reference 4.1.5)
3.3.1.6   History Data Sheets (reference 4.1.6)
3.3.1.7   Malfunction Incident Reports (reference 4.4.3.4)
     
3.3.1.8   Monthly Progress Reports (reference 4.4.1)
 
3.3.1.9   Program Evaluation and Review Reports (reference 4.4.2)
3.3.1.10  Operation and Maintenance Manual (reference 4.4.3.1)
3.3.1.11  Technical Reference Manual (reference 4.4.3.2)
3.3.1.12  Updates to all documentation as required to reflect
          changes or upgrades made (reference 4.4.3.3)
3.3.1.13  Progress Review Meetings (reference 4.5)
3.3.2     Contractor Furnished Property.  The contractor shall
furnish all equipment, supplies and material required to produce
and deliver all items deliverable under this contract.
3.3.3     Government Furnished Property.  None.
3.4  PRODUCTION/DELIVERY SCHEDULE
3.4.1     As shown in Figure 3.1 the project timeline consists of
contract award, first article testing/acceptance, and a production/
delivery schedule to ensure timely field installations to meet
project commitments.  Figure 3.2 details the timeline required to
meet first article test/acceptance milestone.  
3.4.2     The contractor shall deliver a total of 120 Integrity
Monitors to the government in lots of fifteen per month for eight
consecutive months following first article acceptance.
3.4.2.1   Acceptance of the first four Integrity Monitors at first
article acceptance shall be considered the first part of the first
delivery lot. 
3.4.2.2   The contractor shall deliver the next eleven Integrity
Monitors to the government not more than thirty days after first
article acceptance.  This shall constitute the second and final
part of the first delivery lot.
3.4.2.3   The contractor shall deliver fifteen Integrity Monitors
per month for the next seven months to complete delivery under this
contract. 
3.5  MAINTENANCE
3.5.1     The contractor shall provide repair, upgrades, documentation
and shipping as provided hereunder.  Equipment is defined herein as all
hardware, software and firmware delivered under this contract.
3.5.1.1   The contractor shall provide all requested equipment
repair during the term of this contract.  The contractor shall
pick-up, repair or replace, and return equipment to the government
within fourteen (14) calendar days of government notification.  The
contractor shall bear all costs of repairing or replacing, and
transporting equipment.  Transportation includes delivery of
equipment from the USCG EECEN, Wildwood, NJ to the contractor's
designated repair facility and return.  The contractor shall be
responsible for any damage or loss of equipment from the time
equipment leaves the government until the equipment is returned.
3.5.1.2   The contractor shall furnish a signed Malfunction
Incident Report with each piece of equipment repaired or replaced. 
The report shall include, as a minimum, the following:
     A.   Receipt date of equipment
     B.   Type and serial number of equipment
     C.   Time spent for repair
     D.   Description of malfunction
     E.   Description of all corrective action, including replacement
	  parts, boards, components, testing, calibration,cleaning, etc.
3.5.1.3   The contractor shall furnish all items and equipment
necessary to repair the equipment.  Parts which have been replaced
shall remain the property of the contractor.
3.5.1.4   The contractor shall unconditionally guarantee the
repaired or replaced equipment for the remainder of the maintenance
period, or a period of 90 calendar days from government acceptance,
whichever is longer.  
3.5.1.5   The contractor shall not be liable for the cost of
transportation or repairs resulting from equipment exposure to
temperature or humidity extremes beyond those specified in
paragraphs 3.1.7.9 or 3.1.7.10, or damages caused by lightning.
3.5.1.6   The contractor shall guarantee that replacement parts for
all equipment delivered herein are available for a period of 60
months.  The contractor shall notify the Contracting Officer 54
months from contract award as to the continuing availability of
parts subsequent to this period.  If parts will not be available
from the contractor, then the government may require the contractor
to furnish information that is available to assist the government
in obtaining such parts from another source.
3.5.1.7   The contractor shall provide the government with a
complete description of any contractor changes or modifications to
firmware provided under this contract, including documentation
which demonstrates proper validation of firmware.  In the event of
new firmware releases, the government may elect to accept later
versions of firmware, and the contractor shall continue to provide
support during the term of the contract, including any renewals
thereof.  If the government elects not to accept such later
revision, this shall not relieve the contractor from informing the
government of, nor preclude the government from accepting,
subsequent versions.  In the event the government declines a new
version, the contractor shall continue to support and correct any
defects of the firmware version in use by the government.  However,
such obligation to correct defects shall be limited to that
necessary to permit the government to use the equipment as
identified in this specification.
3.5.1.8   The contractor shall maintain, revise and upgrade
documentation as changes are made to equipment.  The contractor
shall provide document revisions or addenda to ensure all 
documentation delivered under this contract is current.
3.5.2     Responsibilities of the Government
3.5.2.1   The government will not attempt repairs to equipment
unless agreed to by the contractor.  This shall not, however,
preclude the government from performing routine maintenance such as
replacement of bulbs or fuses, or attempts to localize malfunctions
to an antenna assembly or receiver.
3.5.3     Acceptance of Repaired or Replaced Equipment
3.5.3.1   Upon completion of repairs, the contractor shall test and
inspect repaired equipment in accordance with the Quality Conformance
Inspection of paragraphs 4.1.2.2 and 4.1.2.3.  The contractor
shall submit Quality Conformance Production Test and Inspection
Results with all repaired equipment returned to the government for
acceptance.
3.5.3.2   Upon receipt, the government will unpack and inspect each
repaired unit.  The government will inspect the Quality Conformance
Production Test and Inspection Results and will update the unit's
History Data Sheet (reference paragraphs 4.1.5 and 4.1.6).  The
government will either accept or reject each repaired unit within
30 days of delivery.  The government reserves the right to subject
any repaired equipment to laboratory testing as a condition of
acceptance.
4.0  PROGRESS/COMPLIANCE
4.1  QUALITY ASSURANCE PROVISIONS
4.1.1     Calibration and Maintenance System.  The contractor shall
maintain a calibration and maintenance system to control the accuracy
of all measurement and test equipment used in the fulfillment of this
specification.  The system shall include prescribed calibration 
intervals, source of calibration and a monitoring system to insure 
adherence to calibration schedules.  The system shall be traceable 
to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Documentation 
in support of this requirement shall be available to the government 
Quality Assurance Representative.  All test and measurement equipment 
shall have current calibration stickers or other means of identification
showing last calibration date, calibration due date, and calibrator's 
initials. 
4.1.2     Minimum Inspections.  Inspections required herein are the
minimum required and are not intended to supplant any controls,
examinations, inspections or tests normally employed by the
contractor to assure the quality of the Integrity Monitors.  The
following types of inspections and tests are required:
4.1.2.1   Contractor's First Article Inspection.  The contractor
shall inspect and test each first article Integrity Monitor prior
to submission for government conducted first article testing. 
Contractor First Article Inspection results shall be furnished to
the government at the time First Article Integrity Monitors are
offered for government first article testing.  Contractor inspection 
and test shall include:
          A.   Not less than 48 hour burn-in
          B.   In-plant test
          C.   Field test
4.1.2.2   Quality Conformance Inspection.  The contractor shall
test and inspect each Integrity Monitor prior to submission for
government acceptance.  Quality Conformance Production Test and
Inspection Results shall be furnished to the government at the time
the Integrity Monitors are offered for acceptance.  Contractor test
and inspection shall include:
          A.   Visual inspection
          C.   Not less than 48 hour Burn-in
          D.   Production Control Test
4.1.2.3   Production Control Tests.  The contractor shall perform
Production Control Tests as part of the Quality Conformance
Inspection on all Integrity Monitors offered for acceptance. 
Production Control Tests shall be developed by the contractor and
approved by the government (reference paragraph 4.1.3).  The
contractor shall notify the government of these tests at least ten
days prior to commencement, enabling the government to witness
these tests if so desired.  Production Control Test results shall
be furnished to the government as part of the Quality Conformance
Inspection results at the time the Integrity Monitors are offered
for acceptance.  As a minimum, these tests must verify alarm
generation and RSIM message handling performance. 
4.1.3     Production Test Plan.  The contractor shall develop and
submit a Production Test Plan to the government for approval.  The
plan shall include all inspections and tests identified herein and
all others performed to verify conformance to this specification. 
No test may begin before government approval of the test plan has
been received.  This test plan shall include: a chronological
listing of the tests and inspections to be performed, location of
test facility, complete listing of all test equipment to be used,
and a traceability matrix of tests and inspections performed to
respective requirements.  The contractor shall maximize the
incorporation of relevant testing normally performed as part of the
contractor's quality management procedures.
4.1.4     Production Test and Inspection Procedures.  The contractor 
shall submit Production Test and Inspection Procedures to the
government for approval.  These procedures shall be in compliance
with the approved Production Test Plan and shall be used in
execution of tests described therein.  The procedures shall include
those items listed in Table 4.1.
4.1.5     Production Test and Inspection Results.  Production Test
and Inspection Results shall be submitted with each Integrity
Monitor offered for acceptance.  The Production Test and Inspection
Results shall describe the results of the Quality Conformance
Inspection as described in paragraph 4.1.2.2.
 
4.1.6     History Data Sheets.  The contractor shall provide a
History Data Sheet with each Integrity Monitor offered for
acceptance.  History Data Sheets shall be prepared by the contractor 
at the time of Integrity Monitor manufacture and shall not be attached
but shall remain with the Integrity Monitor throughout its operational 
lifetime.  Each History Data Sheet shall contain, as a minimum, the 
information as outlined in Table 4.2.
4.2  GOVERNMENT TESTS
Government conducted testing will take place at the US Coast
Guard's Electronics Engineering Center (EECEN), Wildwood, New
Jersey and the US Navy's Naval Command, Control and Ocean 
Surveillance Center, RDT&E Division Detachment (NRaD), Warminster,
Pennsylvania.
4.2.1     First Article Tests.  The contractor shall supply four
complete Integrity Monitors with associated documentation, cables,
connectors and Local Control Interface as first article deliverables.
These four first articles will be extensively tested and
evaluated both in the laboratory under simulated conditions and in
the field with actual satellite signals and high power marine
radiobeacon for full compliance to specifications.  The government
will only accept these articles upon complete satisfaction that
first articles meet or exceed all specifications as defined herein.
4.2.1.1   The contractor shall deliver:
          A.   complete technical documentation not more than 50
	       days after contract award,
          B.   all cables with Integrity Monitor connectors 
	       required for first article testing not more than 60
	       days after contract award, and
          C.   four Integrity Monitors, Local Control Interfaces,
	       and any special test instrumentation or equipment 
	       (reference paragraph 4.2.3) for first article testing
	       in accordance with clause entitled "52.209-4  FIRST 
	       ARTICLE APPROVAL--GOVERNMENT TESTING (SEP 1989) 
	       ALTERNATE I (SEP 1989)," herein.
4.2.1.2   The contractor shall provide government test personnel
with familiarization and instruction in the proper use of equipment
at the laboratory facility between 75 and 80 days after contract
award.
4.2.1.3   The contractor shall ensure his equipment is ready for
first article testing not more than 80 days after contract award. 
First article testing shall commence 80 days after contract award.
4.2.2     Production Lot Acceptance Tests.  The government reserves
the right to select any number of Integrity Monitors from each
production lot for laboratory testing as a condition of acceptance.
4.2.3     Special Test Equipment:  The contractor shall provide any
contractor-unique test equipment required to enable the government
to conduct first article test and, if the government elects to
conduct them, production lot acceptance tests.  This equipment
shall include but not be limited to any special test antennas and
diagnostic tools.  These items, with the exception of any special
test antennas, will be returned to the contractor prior to
conclusion of this contract.
4.3  ACCEPTANCE
4.3.1     The government will unpack and inspect each Integrity
Monitor delivered to EECEN.  The government will inspect the
Quality Conformance Production Test and Inspection Results, and the
Integrity Monitor History Data Sheets.  Integrity Monitors will
either be accepted or rejected in accordance with clause entitled
"U.S. Coast Guard Inspection and/or Acceptance (Destination)." 
Notification will be provided after all units in the lot have been
examined.  
4.3.2     Final acceptance of products, services, and documentation
required herein shall be in accordance with Section E (Inspection
and Acceptance) of this solicitation.
4.4  DOCUMENTATION
4.4.1     Monthly Progress Reports.  The contractor shall submit
Monthly Progress Reports in accordance with DI-MGMT-80227 (tailored).
These may be submitted in letter form and of the contractor's
format.  For those months which include a Progress Review Meeting,
the contractor shall include meeting documentation in the Monthly
Progress Report (e.g. attendance, agenda, minutes, action items,
action plans, conclusions and recommendations).
 
4.4.2     Program Evaluation and Review Reports.  The contractor
shall submit monthly updates in accordance with DI-MGMT-80505.
4.4.3     Technical Documentation.  The contractor shall provide
technical documentation as described below, along with the right to
reproduce and adapt these documents as needed for government
training and maintenance.
4.4.3.1   Operation and Maintenance Manual.  The contractor shall
supply a commercial-off-the-shelf Operation and Maintenance Manual
with each Integrity Monitor delivered for acceptance.  This
Operation and Maintenance Manual will be used by government field
personnel to assist in the installation, setup, checkout, operation,
and minor routine maintenance of each Integrity Monitor at the 
installed site.
4.4.3.2   Technical Reference Manual.  The contractor shall provide
detailed Technical Reference Manuals which address operation,
maintenance, troubleshooting, diagnostics, data formats, software
utilities, interfaces, connectors, pin descriptions, etc.  These
documents are intended for use as references in applicable Coast
Guard control stations, engineering laboratories, program offices,
maintenance and logistics commands, training centers, and depots. 
The contractor shall submit a draft Technical Reference Manual for
government review and approval, and a subsequent Final Technical
Reference Manual which incorporates any changes resulting from
first article testing and government review.
  
4.4.3.3   Updates.  The contractor shall provide updates to all
Operation and Maintenance Manuals and Technical Reference Manuals
as equipment hardware or software changes are implemented.
4.4.3.4   Malfunction Incident Report.  The contractor shall
provide a Malfunction Incident Report with each piece of equipment
repaired or replaced.  The report shall include, as a minimum: the
receipt date of equipment for repair, type and serial number, time
spent for repair, a description of the malfunction, and a description
of all corrective action taken (including replacement parts,
boards, components, testing, calibration, cleaning, etc.).
4.5  PROGRESS REVIEW MEETINGS
4.5.1     The contractor shall hold progress review meetings to
discuss and review the issues of this contract.  The contractor
shall notify the government of all meetings at least 10 working
days prior to the meeting and shall submit a proposed agenda to the
government for approval at least 7 days prior to the proposed
meeting.  The contractor shall conduct the meetings, record minutes
and action items of meetings, supply all meeting/presentation
material, provide copies of presented materials for all government
attendees, and provide facilities and equipment as necessary to
conduct such meetings.  Government attendance will be limited to
not more than ten representatives unless notification has been
given to the contractor at least five days in advance of the
meeting.   
4.5.2     Meetings shall consist of:
     4.5.2.1   One Post Award Conference.  The contractor shall
conduct an initial meeting at the contractor's facility not more
than two weeks after contract award.
     4.5.2.2   One Post First Article Test Meeting.  The contractor
shall conduct a meeting at the contractor's facility not more than
one month after first article test.
     4.5.2.3   One Concluding Meeting.  The contractor shall hold
a final program meeting at the contractor's facility not more than
fifteen months after contract award. 
5.0  DELIVERY
5.1  First Article Test:   The contractor shall deliver first
article test units and associated equipment to the government's
test laboratory specified at Clause entitled "52.209-4 FIRST
ARTICLE APPROVAL--GOVERNMENT TESTING (SEP 1989) ALTERNATE I (SEP
1989)."  Immediately following familiarization and instruction
(reference paragraph 4.2.1.2) the government will select two
complete first articles which shall remain at the government's test
laboratory specified above and two complete first articles which
the government will transport to the Coast Guard's Electronics
Engineering Center (EECEN) for field testing.
5.2. The contractor shall deliver all subsequent Integrity
Monitors, documents, reports, hardware, software and training to
the address cited at Clauses entitled "PLACE OF DELIVERY -
DESTINATION" and "PLACE OF DELIVERY OF DATA - DESTINATION."

6.0  NOTES
6.1  TYPE 15 MESSAGE FORMAT (IONOSPHERIC  MEASUREMENT)
Words 1 and 2
     Message header per RTCM SC104
Word 3
     Bits  1- 5:    Satellite ID
     Bits  6-21:    Ionospheric Measurement
     Bits 22-24:    Ionospheric Rate Measurement (upper 3 bits)
     Bits 25-30:    Parity
Word 4
     Bits  1-12:    Ionospheric Rate Measurement (lower 12 bits)
     Bits 13-17:    Satellite ID
     Bits 18-24:    Ionospheric Measurement (upper 7 bits)
     Bits 25-30:    Parity
Word 5
     Bits  1- 9:    Ionospheric Measurement (lower 9 bits)
     Bits 10-24:    Ionospheric Rate Measurement
     Bits 25-30:    Parity
The Type 15 Message shall contain the measurements for up to two
satellites.  The units for the Ionospheric Measurements are meters,
it has a range of 0 to 164.09 meters and a scale factor of 0.25 cm. 
The units for the Ionospheric Rate Measurement are cm/min (rms), it
has a range of 409.6 cm/min and a scale factor of 0.025 cm/min.
reserved for figure 3.1reserved for figure 3.2TABLE 4.1
TEST AND INSPECTION PROCEDURES

Test and inspection procedures shall include the following:
1.   A chronological listing of tests and inspections to be
performed.
2.   Location of test facility.
3.   A complete listing of all equipment to be used
4.   Step-by-step test and inspection procedures for the test
configuration and pass/fail criteria.
5.   All information necessary to describe all aspects of the test
or inspection.
6.   Test data sheets shall be provided with the test procedures
and shall be used to record observed performance data.  Included
with the completed test data sheet shall be a summary of all
deficiencies noted and the corrective action taken.  It shall also
include any recommended changes to the detailed test procedures. 
The data sheet shall include the following:
          A. Time and date of test or inspection
          B. Equipment serial numbers
          C. Test equipment and serial numbers
          D. Name of test or inspection being performed.  Include
	     reference to the requirement and test paragraphs of this
	     specification,the applicable test plan paragraph, and the
	     test procedure being used.
          E. Pass/Fail criteria
          F. Actual measured values
          G. Summary of deficiencies and corrective action taken
          H. Recommended changes to inspection and test procedures
          I. Date, names and signatures of test or inspection
             personnel
          J. Name and signature of Government witness, if any.
TABLE 4.2
HISTORY DATA SHEETS

History Data Sheets shall include, as a minimum, the following:
1.   Item part and identifying number
2.   Date of fabrication
3.   Date and results of visual inspection
4.   Burn-in
     A.   Date and time of start of burn-in
     B.   Itemized failures and corrective action taken
     C.   Date and time of repeated burn-in, if necessary
     D.   Date and time of completion of burn-in
5.   Date and results of all testing with itemized listing of
     defects and corrective action taken, if applicable.
6.   Date of contractor final acceptance
7.   Space to record date of government acceptance
8.   Space to record date and location where unit is placed in
     service
9.   Space to record additional information such as inspections,
     failures, repairs, maintenance, storage, operational 
     redeployments,etc. which may occur through the lifetime of 
     the equipment.
10.  Space for additional remarks or entries